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buttitch
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Veröffentlicht am Mon, Mar 22, 2010 16:33

General Bruce C. Clarke once stated, "Regardless of age or grade, soldiers should be treated as mature individuals. They are engaged in an honorable profession and deserve to be treated as such." In 1879 August 11, Major General John M. Schofield addressed to the United States Corps of Cadets the following. "The discipline which makes the soldiers of a free country reliable in battle is not to be gained by harsh tyrannical treatment. On the contrary, such treatment is far more likely to destroy than to make an army." It is possible to impart instruction and to give commands in such a manner and such a tone of voice to inspire in the soldier no feeling but an intense desire to obey, while the opposite manner and tone of voice cannot fail to excite strong resentment and a desire to disobey. In ..:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" />America's Army, respect means recognizing and appreciating the natural dignity and worth of all people. This value reminds you that your Soldiers and people in general, are your greatest resource. Army leaders honor everyone's individual worth by treating all people with dignity and respect. As America becomes more culturally diverse, Army leaders must be aware that they will deal with people from a wide range of ethnic, racial, religious, and different backgrounds. Effective leaders are tolerant of beliefs different from their own as long as those beliefs don't conflict with the Army values, are not illegal, and are not unethical. As an Army leader, we need to avoid misunderstandings arising from cultural differences. Actively seeking to learn about people and cultures different from our own will enhance our knowledge. Being sensitive to other cultures can also aid you in counseling your troops more effectively. You show respect when you seek to understand your troop's background and when you can see things from their perspective, and appreciate what's important to them. Respect is treating others with consideration and honor. It is the ability to accept and value other individuals. Respect is developed by accepting others and acknowledging their worth without feeling obligated to embrace all of their ideas. A Soldier approaches you and offers a better way to get a job done. Instead of showing the soldier respect you tell him "you'll do it my way because I am the boss!" This is not showing respect. As an Army leader, we must also make sure everyone is treated with dignity and respect regardless of race, gender, creed, or religious belief. All of us possess special skills and hold to certain values. Without respect for all other individuals there would not be an organized and team oriented Army. Nurturing this environment begins with: how you live Army values shows your troops how they should live them. However, values' training is another key contributor. Effective training helps create a general understanding of Army values and the standards you expect. When you conduct it as part of your regular routine, such as during developmental counseling sessions, you emphasize the message that respect for others is part of the character of every Soldier. Combined with your example, as a leader, such education creates an organizational environment that promotes consideration for others, fairness in all connections, and equal opportunity. As part of this consideration, leaders create an environment in which subordinates are challenged, where they can reach their full potential and be all they can be. Providing tough training doesn't demean subordinates; in fact, building their capabilities and showing confidence in their potential is showing them first hand respect. Valuable leaders take the time to learn what their subordinates want to accomplish. They counsel their Soldiers on how they can grow personally and professionally. Not all subordinates will succeed equally, but they all deserve respect. Respect is also a crucial part of the development of disciplined, organized, and successful war fighting teams. In the fatal confusion of combat, Soldiers often overcome unbelievable odds to accomplish the mission and shield the lives of their comrades. The spirit of selfless service and duty is built on a Soldier's personal trust and regard for fellow Soldiers. A leader's eagerness to tolerate discrimination or harassment on any basis, or a failure to promote an environment of respect, corrupts the trust and can literally destroy the foundation of the Army. But respect goes even beyond issues of discrimination and harassment; it includes the broader matter of civility, the way people treat each other and those they come in contact with. It involves being aware of diversity and one's own behaviors that others may find insensitive, offensive, or abusive. Leaders, like their Soldiers, should treat everyone with dignity and respect including while participating in a counseling session. Giving respect also earns respect.


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justyforya
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Veröffentlicht am Mon, Apr 05, 2010 12:33

Interesting Blog... One thing I didn't understand was, "A Soldier approaches you and offers a better way to get a job done. Instead of showing the soldier respect you tell him 'you'll do it my way because I am the boss!'". Now I always thought in the mil, when an officer or soldier of superior rank gives an order you obey it 'regardless'. Perhaps in today's 'new' mil things are different, and now orders are first sent through committees for discussion?


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